Development Finance News:- Building regulations are set to get stricter next year in a bid to tackle climate change and cut carbon emissions.

The government has released a consultation paper this week which wants to see carbon emissions of new homes cut by a third by 2020. The deadlines for giving feedback on proposed changes to part L and F of current building regulations is 11.45 am on January 10, 2020.

In the longer term, it’s proposing a future homes standard which would spell an end to fossil fuel heating systems, such as gas boilers, by 2025.

Cleaner technologies such as cutting-edge solar panels and air source heat pumps would be employed instead to cut emissions by up to 80 per cent.

Housing secretary, Robert Jenrick said: “Building new homes isn’t just about bricks and mortar. I want to ensure everyone – including developers – do their bit to protect the environment and give the next generation beautiful, environmentally friendly homes that local communities can support.”

Grand designs

The Ministry of Housing Communities and Local Government, MHCLG, has published a national design guide for developers to build attractive well-thought-out homes.

In the next few months, every council across the UK will be expected to produce design guides reflecting their unique setting, character and history while meeting national standards.

Development Finance by HZA

Brokers Hank Zarihs Associates said development finance lenders were keen to see better designs when offering construction loans and development and refurbishment finance for projects.

Fast Bridging Loans

The government also confirmed proposals to speed up the planning system with fee refunds for delayed decisions on applications.

It’s also proposing a new tiered planning system with clearer guidelines for extensions and modifications of homes. The government said applications fees would be reviewed to ensure planning authorities were properly resourced.

The accelerated planning green paper is expected to be published next month. It will take forward proposals to allow homes to be built above existing properties as well as seeking views on demolishing old commercial buildings for new housing.

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